Tag Archives: hygiene

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The Thorn in India’s #Environmental Side: Open Defecation and a Review of #SwachhBharat.

Happy World Environment Day from all of us here at HEEALS! In honour of this important day, this blog post will reflect on India as this year’s global host for World Environment Day, with specific focus on The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation’s “Swachh Bharat Mission”, and it’s goal of making India Open Defecation Free (ODF) by 2019.

Read full article at : https://heeals.blogspot.com/2018/06/the-thorn-in-indias-environmental-side.html

#environmentday #worldenvironmentday #opendefecation #swacchbharat#sanitation #water #hygiene #environment #safeenvironmentWorld Environment Day Poster 1#cleanenvironment #protectenvironment #heealsenvironmentproject#greenearth

Food Hygiene In School

Education in India is provided by the public sector as well as the private sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: central, state, and local. Public/government schools: Most schools in India are funded and run by the government.

However, the public education system faces serious challenges, including a lack of adequate infrastructure, insufficient funding, a shortage of staff and scarce facilities.

What is food hygiene?

Food hygiene are the conditions and measures necessary to ensure the safety of food from production to consumption.

The 13th of July 2013, in Patna, 22 children died to have eaten in their canteens. The food was served in receipt with chemical problems.

More recently,the 25th of February 2016, in Mumbai, 100 children went at the hospital after having mid-day meal in a government school. No one died but that it would have be a tragedy.

The hygiene problem is always the same, people have to eat with her hand. They don’t have plates, spoons and forks to eat.And it is not always clean. People are not informed about hygiene.

Things have to chance to ameliorate hygiene conditions. If nothing changes,the parents won’t send their children to school if they know their children will die. Consequence:decrease of Indian alphabetization.
Is it normal to send children to school and there are risks of disease, infection and malnutrition?

The government has put a new condition to help poor families to send children to school. The program is to pay the canteen for all families. This is a very good thing happening.

A kid who doesn’t like the food, doesn’t eat. Children should have the choice of what they want to eat to ameliorate malnutrition problem.

On the TV, the government should tell to the population how they can ameliorate hygiene condition at schools and at home. If the government does this television program, everyone could change their provided hygiene and India will be less sick.

Heeals needs your support and volunteers to change to improve the living conditions. Your action, even the smallest, will change the life of Indian people.

By-Heeals Intern

Picture : HeealsFood Hygiene In School Program By HEEALS

Water Sanitation Hygiene ( Menstrual Hygiene) Campagin

Pictures Gallery Link

Water Sanitation Hygiene ( Menstrual Hygiene) Campaign And Distribution Of WASH And Education Materials In Schools Of Bhatipura Village ,Meerut, Khora And Noida .
Campaign Supported By Soap Box , Mika And Sarah .
Campaign Coordinator : Richa ,Sonika & Amy

 

Pictures Gallery Link

Achieving The ‪#‎Globalgoals‬: Why ‪#‎Volunteers‬ Are Important

Achieving The ‪#‎Globalgoals‬: Why ‪#‎Volunteers‬ Are Important

The new agenda for sustainable development will frame global peace and development efforts in 2016-2030 in all countries, regardless of their development level. It has a wider scope and aims at tackling both vertical and cross-cutting issues. It also explicitly recognizes volunteer groups as stakeholders to achieve the new set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as global goals.

Read At : http://volunteerheeals.blogspot.in/…/achieving-global-goals…

Meet Our Extraordinary Supporters ! Silvia Caro

Meet Our Extraordinary Supporters ! Silvia Caro! Made Hand Wash With Soap Video !
Come Join Us & Be A Part Of Extraordinary Supporters

Santa & Soap campaign

Santa & Soap campaign was carried out in 10 schools in National Capital Region . Santa distributed 4000 soap bars and gifts to children .
Santa Creating awareness regarding Water Sanitation Hygiene ,hand wash with soap and adopt good hygiene practice. To bring a good behavior change among the children.
Campaign supported by : Soap Box

VOLUNTEERING BRINGS GOOD LIFE

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Volunteering at HEEALS can be an enriching and empowering experience. Not only does it give people a chance to do something to benefit others, it brings with it a sense of personal fulfillment and worthVolunteering can provide opportunities to use your skills in many ways.

 

Great thing to see young kids volunteering and learning to give something of them. Start your children young. Teach them to contribute and help others. It helps a child build confidence, humility, skills and a good attitude about life. Yes, it contributes to a child in many of the same ways as it contributes to an adult.

 

Most people complain about government spending and how government gets into too many areas of our lives where they don’t belong. A large way we can reduce government spending and involvement in our lives is by volunteering. If every individual volunteered just an hour a week, we could replace lakhs of Rupess  spent on social issues with our services.

 

Positive Impact – Be Part of the Solution

Making the world a better place is actually very simple. Participate in the solution, not the problem. You don’t need to give much of your time to make a positive impact. A few hours each month can make the life of someone much better and make a world a better place.

 

Humble Yourself

Seeing life through others’ eyes can be a bit humbling. When life gets a little tough, volunteering can help you see life may be better then you thought. It also helps take your mind off your own problems. It adds perspective and helps solve personal issues.

 

Challenge Yourself & Others

Sometimes work doesn’t provide enough challenges or the right type of challenge. Volunteering can add the challenge you might be looking for. Sometimes work doesn’t offer areas of education or skill development you need to enhance your career or qualify for a promotion. Volunteering may be just what you need for your next promotion.

 

Personal Growth

Do you have an area of interest or a personal skill you would like to learn? Volunteering helps in building personal skills and growth.

 

Revive your Skills

Have you learned a skill in your lifetime that you rarely have the opportunity to use today? Volunteering can give you the chance to do something you enjoy or revive your  skill that is a bit out of practice or even outdated.

 

 

 

Meet like minded People’s  

Volunteering can offer the opportunity to meet people with the same interests you have. It’s also a way to become part of a community, meet your neighbors or feel at home in a community.

 

Stay Younger

Volunteering brings fountain of youth. Volunteering brings energy, activeness and happiness. Any of these experiences will make you feel younger.

 

Feel Good & Build Self Confidence

Contributing to others and the community you live in make you feel good about yourself and your life. It can also give you a more positive view of your community.

 

Use Your Hobby and Interest to Contribute

 

There’s no better way to contribute then through a hobby and interest you love. Your hobby can improve the lives of others and you get to do more of something you love. Imagine that!

 

 

Website: http://www.heeals.org

For Volunteering Contact At : communications@heeals.org

World Toilet Day: Celebrating a basic human right

By: Sylvie Hughes
Gurgaon, India
19th November 2013

The figures provided by World Toilet Day reveal that 2.5 billion people in the world do not have access to clean toilets. India has the largest number of people defecating in the open in the world. A staggering 638 million still practice open defecation, and less than half of India’s population are using  toilets.  Lack of hygiene awareness, lack of access to facilities, and social and behavioral patterns are the main causes of high disease rates, lack of education opportunities and deaths across the country.

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By viewing statistics of toilet access in schools, one can gain an idea of the condition of the country as a whole regarding access to toilet facilities: Of all of India’s rural primary schools, only 1 in 6 have toilet facilities. Often the children have to walk home just to use the toilet, or walk further away to defecate in the open. The amount of time that children have to spend walking a distance to relieve themselves severely disrupts productivity in schools.

 

 

In girl’s schools in particular, the problem is graver: 66 % of girls’ schools do not have functioning toilets. Around 23 % of girls drop out of school every year in India due to lack of proper toilet facilities. Many school toilets are not gender segregated, making trips to the toilet uncomfortable or intimidating experiences for girls. Many toilets also do not provide adequate menstrual hygiene facilities such a bins to dispose sanitary pads. Girls are either forced to return home to use the toilet or change pads, or decide to drop out of school completely.
The female population are particularly suffering due to these conditions, becoming victims of health problems due to economic disparity. They are unable to grow to find a good career if they drop out of schools with poor sanitation facilities. This in turn leads to a lower living standard, where women face problems of sexual harassment and abuse.

 
1 in 3 women worldwide risk shame, sexual harassment and attacks due to lack of toilet facilities. In rural areas, where women have to defecate in the open, they face the risk of sexual assault if they have to walk further out to a remote area to defecate, particularly during the night time. As a result, many women are facing health problems caused by waiting until the morning to relieve themselves.  For other women, the only time to relieve themselves would be at night time, to avoid being seen by others. In rural areas, incidents of rape are commonly caused by lack of toilet facilities.

 
In addition to lack of clean toilets, there is a lack in proper sanitation facilities, such as clean running water and soap. In India over 1600 children die every day due to diarrhea related diseases. This is because more than half the population do not wash their hands after defecation, making diseases such as respiratory and gastrointestinal infections major killers among children and adults alike.
A key element to breaking the practice of open defecation is changing the behavior of people who have practiced open defecation for generations. Many rural communities have not had access to education on hygiene practices, therefore are unaware of the serious health risks caused by open defecation. Installing toilet facilities in the area is not sufficient, as they still may not be used by the majority of people who aren’t used to using toilets. Therefore, providing hand washing and toilet hygiene awareness is crucial to changing the toilet practices of the population.

 
To those who have lived their whole lives using clean, safe toilets, the figures provided by World Toilet Day would be shocking. The lives of 2.5 billion people are severely affected and even cut short because they have no toilets. Access to toilets should not be a privilege but a basic right for every person.
Let’s celebrate our toilets on World Toilet Day!  Join HEEALS in our mission to provide clean toilet facilities to schools and rural and urban slum areas across India.
HEEALS (Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society), is working on Water Sanitation, Menstrual Hygiene and Toilet Building projects in five states: Delhi (National Capital Region), Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Leh Ladakh, Himachal Pradesh and Haryana.
HEEALS works in slum schools, schools in unauthorised colonies, orphanages and refugee camps.  Through spreading education on Sanitation and  Menstrual Hygiene and building clean safe, toilets HEEALS is working to increase the attendance rates of pupils in schools, reduce the number of diseases and deaths and improve the health of people across Indian society. Find out more about its projects at http://www.heeals.org and support our work!

 

 

Sources: UNICEF,  RTE Forum

Fighting Child Marriage through Hygiene Awareness

By Sylvie Hughes

Gurgaon, India

5th November 2013

Child marriage in India affects a huge  portion of adolescent girls in the country.  With 47% of girls in India marrying below the legal minimum age of 18,  India has the highest number of child brides than any other nation in the world. 

However, despite its huge  number of illegal marriages, in October India refused to sign the first ever UN resolution against the practice of child marriage – an initiative which is being supported by 107 other countries worldwide.

childbride

Child brides face a multitude of serious mental and physical health problems.  Young married  girls face problems of sexual and domestic abuse, causing high rates of severe depression.  Girls as young as 13 drop out of school once they get married, and as a result they are unable to continue their education or seek help. The section of society who are the most in need of education, health and hygiene awareness are unable to access  it. This leads to  an increase in serious health risks caused by early childbirth and lack of menstrual hygiene awareness.

Girls below the age of 15 are five times more likely to die in childbirth than women in their 20s. With over 50% of adolescent girls in India suffering from anaemia, the increased blood supply demand during pregnancy causes even more of a strain on their health. According to the  National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR), early marriage and adolescent pregnancies are one of the main causes of anaemia amongst girls in India.

Adolescent pregnancies are also one of the main reasons for infant deaths in hospitals. Children born to adolescent mothers are twice more at risk of neonatal mortality (death within the first month) than those born to older mothers, and the younger the mother, the higher the risk.  Many infants are born underweight due to the mother suffering from malnutrition and anaemia, which further increases the risk of health problems and death for the infant.

Educating girls in Menstrual Hygiene and healthcare can be a crucial element in reducing the number of child marriages in India. Access to Menstrual Hygiene awareness projects provide girls with knowledge on proper nutrition and hygiene practices to avoid suffering from anaemia on the onset of menstruation, as well as educating girls about the numerous health risks that are caused by early marriage. Increased awareness decreases not only the 23% school drop out rate from menstruation-related problems, but  also the number of girls entering into child marriage.

Preventing adolescent births have been proven to significantly lower population growth rates, improving the health of adolescent girls and potentially generating large economic and social benefits for the country as a whole.

HEEALS (Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society), is working on a Menstrual Hygiene awareness and Girl Education project in five states: Delhi (National Capital Region), Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Leh Ladakh, Himachal Pradesh and Haryana. HEEALS works in slum schools, schools in unauthorised colonies, orphanages and refugee camps.  Through spreading education on Menstrual Hygiene and providing iron supplement tablets through our Free Health Camp initiative, HEEALS is working to eradicate the practice of child marriage and provide better futures for girls across India’s society. Find out more about its Menstrual Hygiene and Girl Education Project at www.heeals.org and support our work!

Stats Sources: UNICEF, PLAN India, NCPCR, UNFPA