Category Archives: sanitation

Funding Is Crucial In Helping To Improve Lives!

Funding Is Crucial In Helping To Improve Lives!

Funding Is Crucial In Helping To Improve Lives!
So Please Come And Became A Helping Hand In Our Projects!
For More Information Please Contact Us At  :Communications@heeals.org
Created By :Mala Nucibella ,Director @Creative MarComms Solution (#UK)
heeals-need-donation-for-projects-2

HEEALS NEED YOU!

HEEALS NEED YOU!
Come Join With Us  Today !
 Watch Live At : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1rISW0wFXY
For More Information Please Contact Us At  :Communications@heeals.org
Created By :Mala Nucibella ,Director @Creative MarComms Solution (#UK)
Come Today To Join Our Following Programs:
 
Volunteer Engagement Program !
Internship Engagement Program 
Volunteer Tour and Travel Program
Gap Year !
Contact at : communications@heeals.org
 

 

 

#Donation Shows Appreciation

#Donation Shows Appreciation

#Donate Today To Support A Project
Without your donation our work for a better tomorrow cannot continue so please donate today
Info-Graphic Designed By : Mala Nucibella Senior Director @ Creative MarComms Solutions (#UK)

#Donate & #Support A #Charity

#Donate & #Support A #Charity

Your Kind Donation Will Help Us Achieve Our Non Profit Goal In Our Local Communities .

Why Volunteers Pay

Why Volunteers Pay

Posted By :   Aviv Hochbaum
Photo Credit :HEEALS

Unlike any “regular” job, volunteering is generally a form of offering one’s skills, knowledge and time FOR FREE. Add to that the expenses typically involved in volunteering abroad (flights, insurance etc.) and you may be left wondering why many of the organizations listed on our platform are actually asking for fees from their prospective volunteers. Don’t get me wrong – I totally get you. The thought of flying across the world to volunteer your time and skills does not instinctively go down with also having to pay the organization you’ll soon be helping. To set matters straight, here are a few quick points that may help you better understand .

Your stay at the organization uses up resources.

Many volunteer organizations offer volunteers to stay at their facilities. Whether it be a home stay or a room at a volunteer house, there are obvious expenses which go into making your stay comfortable. Water, electricity, internet, food, and even some Western amenities – all of these are resources spent on your stay, that otherwise the organization would not have to spend. Of course you are bringing your skills and time, for free, but understand that at the same time you’d be using other costly resources that would not have otherwise been spent by the organization. Thus, asking volunteers to cover these expenses is extremely reasonable.

Your money can help advance ongoing activities and projects after you leave.

One of the biggest hopes volunteers have when they near the end of their volunteer trip is to know that their time was well spent; that their efforts and hard work will leave a mark even after they have already returned home. Sometimes, volunteers are able to further promote and advance projects that are already running, while others initiate new projects with the skills and knowledge that they bring with them. In any case, these projects require various resources in order to continue – whether it be the people to work on them, the tools and materials that are used, or the space itself needed for the project. These things require money. The money you provide when you volunteer may very well help cover the expenses of these projects so that they can continue to move forward, even after you’ve already left.
Your money can help advance ongoing activities and projects after you leave.
One of the biggest hopes volunteers have when they near the end of their volunteer trip is to know that their time was well spent; that their efforts and hard work will leave a mark even after they have already returned home. Sometimes, volunteers are able to further promote and advance projects that are already running, while others initiate new projects with the skills and knowledge that they bring with them. In any case, these projects require various resources in order to continue – whether it be the people to work on them, the tools and materials that are used, or the space itself needed for the project. These things require money. The money you provide when you volunteer may very well help cover the expenses of these projects so that they can continue to move forward, even after you’ve already left.
Your stay has added expenses to the general activities of the organization.
To many it may seem like “little things” that could easily be overlooked, but they shouldn’t be. From the individual who met you at the airport to drive you to the organization site, to another who showed you around and made sure you are set with everything you’ll be doing. Some organizations even prepare orientation days and pamphlets to make sure volunteers are best situated. Many times, organizations even offer weekend excursions to show you around and make sure some extra fun is also had on your trip. Once again – all of these are added expenses due to your stay. While the organization would like to make sure your arrival is welcoming and your time is enjoyable, these aren’t expenses they can generally take on, which is why your fees are totally helpful in such instances as well.
Because it will help.
Ultimately, most grassroots community-based/charity organizations run on a shoestring budget and are inviting volunteers to help simply because they can’t afford to pay people to work. They are working long and hard to make some remarkable changes in their communities, and it isn’t an easy job. There are countless hurdles and hardships that are continuously popping up. Bottom line, they could totally use the money.
We Believe “Volunteering can make a difference in your own life as much as it can in other peoples”
Come Join Our Volunteer Engagement Program !
 
Contact at : communications@heeals.org
 

“World Voices For WASH”

We released our new video “World Voices For WASH” Which show the importance of Wash in our lives.
Please Click Below To Watch The Video !

Continue reading “World Voices For WASH”

Results from HEEALS report: Water Sanitation & Girl Education

In August 2013, HEEALS carried out a monitoring and evaluation  exercise on its Water Sanitation and Girl Education projects in three schools following the delivery of previous awareness training. Results of the monitoring and evaluation are now available to view in our HEEALS report.

One issue to consider is that despite many girls having a good awareness and knowledge of Menstrual Hygiene, they are unable to practice what they know due to lack of facilities available in school.  The bad conditions of toilet facilities were reported by most participants, who stated that there was nowhere to place sanitary pads and no soap or water for hand washing. Similarly, many girls displayed an awareness of the importance of hand washing, yet were unable to put this into practice at school.

Schools greatly influence the behavior and mentality of children – they look to school as a source of knowledge. Yet through lack of sanitation facilities, schools are contributing to creating the mentality that hand washing and hygiene practices are not necessary. Lack of Menstrual Hygiene facilities  lead to menstrual hygiene becoming an invisible issue which is not addressed, increasing the  embarrassment  of young girls to discuss Menstrual Hygiene.

Another key point to consider is that most girls reported being treated differently by their family during menstruation, and cited parental choice as the main factor in the girl’s education. Parents need to be included in Menstrual Hygiene and Water Sanitation awareness projects as well as teachers and male students, to develop understanding surrounding these issues and to support girls in obtaining a good education.

Read the full report here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3-sg3TTDoppRlFxRW8yeDJSWkU/edit?usp=sharing

Dealing openly with open defecation

Of the world’s seven billion people, 1.1 billion people still defecate in the open. With 638 million people engaging in this, India is the open defecation capital of the world.

The countries where open defecation is most widely practiced are the same countries with the highest numbers of under-five child deaths, high levels of under-nutrition and poverty, and large disparities of wealth. Each year, 1.5 million children around the world under the age of five, and 1,000 a day in India alone, die of diarrhoea caused by unsanitary conditions and poor hygiene, exacerbated by the ongoing practice of open defecation.

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After more than a decade of work by the World Toilet Organisation, the UN has now formally recognised 19 November as World Toilet Day – a huge step forward in addressing the problem of open defecation. Help more children to reach their fifth birthday by supporting the work of civil society organisations to improve sanitation and hygiene.  Find out more at: http://www.heeals.org

Find out more about the UN and World Toilet Day: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=45490#.UhRhMuBC9UQ

WASH in Indian schools: A national mission

Sanitation and hygiene issues in schools remain high on the development agenda in India, more than a decade after the start of the Total Sanitation Campaign, evidenced by the holding of the first WASH in Schools Leadership Course held in Delhi from 6-9 August. The course was organised by the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation (MDWS), the Administrative Staff College of India and UNICEF. More than 130 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Educational professionals from 25 states are reported to have participated. 
The course aims to increase the capacity of local and national actors working in WASH in schools (WinS) interventions under the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (Total Sanitation Campaign).

Although a lot of progress has been made under the TSC, there is still a lot of work to be done. As the Secretary of the MDWS, Mr. Pankaj Jain, stated, “WASH in Schools should be a National Mission”. At the moment, it is far beyond achieving success at a national level. Mr Louis George’s Arsenault, Representative, UNICEF, acknowledged WASH in Schools as a critical component of child-friendly education, contributing to a healthy and conducive learning environment and a significant reduction in absenteeism and dropout rates, especially among girls. “It also has an impact on enhanced primary school attendance, improved health and cognitive development, increasing girls’ participation in school,” he said.

IMG_1993

With WASH programmes still lacking in schools across India, HEEALS (Health Education Environment And Livelihood Society), based in Gurgaon, is trying to contribute towards a national mission by conducting WASH awareness in schools in slum areas and unauthorized zones where no other WASH agents are operating. HEEALS plans to carry out a Water Sanitation Menstrual Hygiene & Girl Education Awareness project across five different states of India including Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh, New Delhi NCR Region and, Leh and Ladakh. The project aims to go into the interior parts of these states where water, sanitation and menstrual hygiene practice are far beyond the reach of most people. “The awareness project will be carried out in places where the dropout rate among girls in schools is high due to the non-availability of separate toilets and lack of awareness about sanitation and menstrual hygiene”, says HEEALS’ Managing Director, Gaurav Kashyap.

Without the work of civil society organisations such as HEEALS and support for their work, the realisation of WASH at a national level can only be aspirational.  Find out more about the work of HEEALS and offer your support at: www.heealsorg. Read the full UNICEF article at: http://www.unicef.org/india/reallives_8335.htm

Addressing the critical issue of menstrual hygiene in India

UNICEF reports that in countries worldwide where menstrual hygiene is taboo, girls in puberty are typically absent for 20% of the school year. Most girls drop out at around 11 to 12-years-old and miss school not simply because they fear being teased by their classmates if they show stains from their period, but also because they are not educated about their periods and their need for safe and clean facilities is not prioritised. In India, 66 % of girls’ schools do not have functioning girls’ toilets resulting in a drop out rate of more than 40% of girls after finishing year 5. Around 23 % of girls drop out of school every year in India due to a lack of menstrual hygiene facilities including toilets or adequate disposal units for sanitary pads.

Girl outside toilet

In A Decade of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC): Rapid Assessment of Processes and Outcomes, undertaken by the Water and Sanitation Programme, in 2010, it states, ‘Disaggregating the impacts of sanitation by gender reveals that the privacy afforded by access to adequate sanitation facilities imparts a sense of dignity, especially to women and young girls. Access to safe sanitation in schools is also linked to continued education enrolment by young girls and teenage women, particularly at puberty (Bruijne et al 2007).’ Despite this statement, there has been a lack of attention paid to providing menstrual hygiene services in the TSC.  This failing not only impacts directly on girls and women but also on the achievement of Millenium Development Goals relating to social exclusion, access to water, sanitation and hygiene services, education and health.

This failing is partially reflective of the gendered balance of power. The TSC represents a departure from the way that conventional rural sanitation programmes have previously been implemented. According to programme guidelines, the TSC seeks to be community-led and demand-driven rather than target-led and supply-driven.  But who is leading the community and driving demand? Women are often excluded from decision-making processes and not represented in community decisions. By generating more awareness of menstrual hygiene, more children can be kept in schools creating a better future for the individual and community, and contributing to MDG 3 of promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women. Menstrual hygiene is a critical issue for agencies to address because lack of facilities to ensure it effect the disempowered and improving facilities is in itself a means of empowerment.

A 2011 programme by UNICEF shows how an improvement in facilities can directly lead to a drop in absenteeism. One school in Krishnagiri noted that over two thirds of girls studying in standard 8 and 9 skipped school during their periods with one third of these girls eventually dropping out.  Following UNICEF’s Menstrual Hygiene and Management programme and the installation of disposal units in schools, the dropout and absenteeism rate in the school has come down to almost zero and academic performance has reportedly improved. (http://www.unicef.org/india/reallives_7579.htm)

HEEALS (Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society), based in Gurgaon, is currently working on an awareness campaign for better sanitation and hygiene practices and the provision of girls’ toilets in five states: Delhi (National Capital Region), Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Leh Ladakh, Himachal Pradesh and Haryana. HEEALS typically works in slum schools or schools in unauthorised areas where no other NGOs are working. It also works with orphanages and refugee camps. Find out more about its Water Sanitation Hygiene and Girl Education Project at www.heeals.org.uk  and support our work.