Sponsor A Child – Chitra’s story

Sponsor A Child – Chitra’s story

chitra sponsor sonika
                        From left to right: Chitra’s mother, Sonika (Chitra’s sponsor) and Chitra.
Chitra, aged 13, is the first child that we have sponsored to go to school, at HEEALS. She is being sponsored by Sonika,  a member of the HEEALS team.  She is in 8th class and loves science! Her mother works as a maid and Chitra has two younger brothers. Due to the recent loss of her father, her mother was unable to pay for all of her children to attend school and so Chitra had to drop out. With the persuasion of her school, and HEEALS, Chitra is now back in school and has a whole year’s worth of education paid for her. We wish her all the best in the year ahead! 
Be A Sponsor
Emails Us : communications@heeals.org

Sponsor a Child with HEEALS

Sponsor a Child with HEEALS#Heeals intern

At HEEALS we are more aware than most that your money spent well is important to you. Unlike most non-profits, 90% of us are volunteers who want nothing more than to improve the conditions and livelihoods of young and very underprivileged children. So help us help them.

Each day HEEALS comes into close contact with children from genuinely under-privileged backgrounds. We witness,first-hand what it means to them the huge impact an education has on the lucky few.

The schooling they receive is led by dedicated teachers in surroundings that certainly make the most of the very limited resources on offer.Sadly, education for India’s poorest is not free in public and private schools and this places a significant financial drain on the families of young children.

In recognition of this HEEALS would like to offer the opportunity to alleviate some of the burden by offering the chance to directly sponsoring a child’s educational costs.

The programme gives the option of sponsoring the whole (complete donor) or a part (semi donor) of a child’s educational fees each month with 100% of the donation going directly to the school.

After being assigned a child, all donors will receive an introductory pack (with photos and details of your child’s community)and bi-annual feedback regardingyour child’s academic performance. For “complete” donors there will also be the option of an annual Skype video call and written correspondence between you and your child.

There isan additional opportunity to visit your child and see for yourself the tangible benefits that your donations have given. All forms of communication shall take place in the presence of HEEALS.

Educational has long been proven as the key to lifting children and families out of long-term poverty. Hope is a wonderful gift.

For more information about us log onto: www.heeals.org

Email Us At : communications@heeals.org

Girls Need An Education ,Not An Early Wedding .

Girls Need An Education ,Not An Early Wedding .

#Anti child marriage

Child marriage is a huge problem in India, affecting the livelihoods of thousands of children, whilst also being a huge drain on the economy of India as a whole. Despite the 2006 Prohibition of Child Marriage Act, child marriage still remains a massive issue. According to Girls Not Brides, an estimated 47% of girls are married before the age of 18.

Child marriage must be tackled in order to improve the livelihoods of the 47% of girls who get married before 18. Child marriage increases the likelihood that girls will become pregnant at an early age, with a UNICEF report from 2012 concluding that in the same year, one in six girls aged 15-19 had already given birth to their first child. At such a young age, girls are more likely to contract illnesses and complications and globally, childbirth is consistently cited as the leading cause of death for women aged 15-19.

Furthermore, child marriage also has a direct impact on whether or not a girl goes to school. Many children drop out of school when they are about to get married, and so they miss out on the full benefits of a rounded education. Because of this lack of education, married girls are also limited in their inability to earn as much money than they could have, if they had stayed in school. In turn, this affects the wider Indian economy, with the International Centre for Research on Women (ICRW) stating that ‘India loses $56 billion USD a year in potential earnings because of adolescent pregnancy, high secondary school dropout rates, and joblessness among young women’. Not only is the health of young girls at risk, but also their education and earning potential.

Child marriage is something that everyone should be concerned with ending. The barrier of child marriage too often prevents girls, people’s daughters, sisters and mothers, from having a healthy and fulfilled life. There are many ways that this can be done. In the past decade, the child marriage rate has improved, arguably due to a drive from the government in the form of legislation and increased awareness and campaigns. The New Delhi Times recently reported that according to the 2015-16 ‘National Family Health Survey’ Haryana has ‘witnessed considerable improvement with around 19% women getting married before the reaching the 18-year mark, as compared to almost 40% women during the 2005-06 survey’.The 2006 Prohibition of Child Marriage Act was a good start, but it is now paramount that there is grassroots action which directly targets vulnerable girls, educating them so that they are aware of the many ways in which their lives could be negatively affected, should they enter into a child marriage.

At H.E.E.A.L.S we have started an Anti-child marriage campaign to raise awareness of the negative impacts on women. as we recognise how child marriage can so drastically affect young girls and their empowerment. This campaign will be primarily delivered through workshops! Like our Facebook, Twitter and follow our blog in order to keep up to date with the developments of our latest campaign!

By :Minnie

Info graphic :Minnie


Girls Not Brides


New Delhi Times Article referenced here :


UNICEF Report, 2012 referenced by the ICRW

Menstrual Hygiene Helps Education

Menstrual hygiene is essential. It ensures that you can continue with your daily routine such as going to school or going to work. It can also prevent potential situations of embarrassment and in turn, make you feel confident about yourself and your body. In this sense, maintaining proper menstrual hygiene is important for your wellbeing and development.

To manage menstruation hygienically and with dignity, it is essential that women and girls have access to water and sanitation.

In India, girls struggle to go to school because of the lack of infrastructure, understanding related to their hygiene and access to modern sanitary products. 66 % of girl schools do not have functioning girl toilets. Girls might be missing as much as 10 to 20% of school days due to menstruation, many are ashamed to go to school.40 % of girls drop out ofschool due to the lack of functioning girl toilets.

Many schools do not support adolescent girls or female teachers in managing menstrual hygiene with dignity. Inadequate water and sanitation facilities make managing menstruation very difficult. The school girls generally described menstruation as a time of anxiety, embarrassment and discomfort especially at school, leading to low concentration in class.23 % of girls drop out of school every year due to a lack of menstrual hygiene facilities at school. Well designed and appropriate water, sanitation and hygiene facilities that address menstrual hygiene can make a significant difference to the schooling experience of girls. If toilets are not clean, then students will fall ill and won’t be able to attend school.

Menstruation is a natural process, but in most parts of the world it is taboo and most people, men in particular, find menstrual hygiene a difficult subject to talk about.

Sometimes, young girls grow up with a limited knowledge of menstruation because their mothers are shy to discuss about the issues with them. Adult women may themselves not be aware of the biological facts or good hygienic practices.
Men and boys typically know even less, but it is important for them to understand menstrual hygiene so they can support their wives, daughters, mothers and students. If schools build functioning toilets for girls, it can be a first step for the hygiene. HEEALS helps girls, boys and even teachers to understand about girls’ needs. HEEALS helps to change the mentality by inform children on water, sanitation and menstrual hygiene so they can become an aware society. Dramas, stories, documentary films and games are some of the good communication tools using by them to provide the information they need.

By -Heeals Intern

Picture:HeealsMemstraul Hygiene Campaign BY HEEALS In India

Food Hygiene In School

Education in India is provided by the public sector as well as the private sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: central, state, and local. Public/government schools: Most schools in India are funded and run by the government.

However, the public education system faces serious challenges, including a lack of adequate infrastructure, insufficient funding, a shortage of staff and scarce facilities.

What is food hygiene?

Food hygiene are the conditions and measures necessary to ensure the safety of food from production to consumption.

The 13th of July 2013, in Patna, 22 children died to have eaten in their canteens. The food was served in receipt with chemical problems.

More recently,the 25th of February 2016, in Mumbai, 100 children went at the hospital after having mid-day meal in a government school. No one died but that it would have be a tragedy.

The hygiene problem is always the same, people have to eat with her hand. They don’t have plates, spoons and forks to eat.And it is not always clean. People are not informed about hygiene.

Things have to chance to ameliorate hygiene conditions. If nothing changes,the parents won’t send their children to school if they know their children will die. Consequence:decrease of Indian alphabetization.
Is it normal to send children to school and there are risks of disease, infection and malnutrition?

The government has put a new condition to help poor families to send children to school. The program is to pay the canteen for all families. This is a very good thing happening.

A kid who doesn’t like the food, doesn’t eat. Children should have the choice of what they want to eat to ameliorate malnutrition problem.

On the TV, the government should tell to the population how they can ameliorate hygiene condition at schools and at home. If the government does this television program, everyone could change their provided hygiene and India will be less sick.

Heeals needs your support and volunteers to change to improve the living conditions. Your action, even the smallest, will change the life of Indian people.

By-Heeals Intern

Picture : HeealsFood Hygiene In School Program By HEEALS

WASH & Education Lesson In School!

Photos from a recent visit to a school in Western Uttar Pradesh, where basic facilities such as a toilet are unavailable. We taught the children about basic ‪#‎Water‬ ‪#‎sanitation‬ ‪#‎hygiene‬ practices, in accordance with WASH principles and even managed to fit in some skipping and a brief English lesson! ‪#‎WASH‬ ‪#‎internationalinternship‬ ‪#‎volounteerabroad‬

New Supporter , Hollywood Actor Cliff Taylor !

Hi Everyone !
Meet Our New Supporter, ‪#‎Hollywood‬ ‪#‎Actor‬ Cliff Taylor .
He is giving one of his best song & music to our short documentary film “Water – AAb” and to many others to upcoming films and works !
We are very thankful to him for supporting our work and film .

cliff taylor with #heeals ngo india